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"SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT"--a skiing web manual: contents (topics at page bottoms of manual)

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   "SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT":
 Tactics for Terrains and Snow Textures and Racing--
Skiing Narrow Trails

by Bill Jones, Ski Instructor

Certified Professional Ski Instructor (Registration #110478), Level III
How To Reserve a Private Ski Lesson with Bill Jones

Narrow ski trails where there is  not width enough for the classic round ski turn are sometimes encountered where less steep routes are cut through the forest to avoid steeper slopes or as runouts below open bowls. At times they may be no more than skinny paths winding among trees. And they may follow valley bottoms along snow-filled streams, adding to the challenge..

Speed management and continual turning in these situations are musts, lest one fly off the side of the trail into a tree or over a bank or go somewhere else you don't want to at a speed you don't want..

The tactic to emphasize in these situations is turning by leg steering with lots of skidding to tighten arcs of turns and manage speed with the friction generated. Sometimes there will not be room or time enough for turns, and then lengthy sideslipping or forward sideslipping are good choices. And keep watching for others who might not manage their speed and turning as well as you, or maybe just want to pass--let them and then they will be out of the way.

With good tactics, narrow trails can be pleasing pathways, providing more intimate looks inside the winter woods than the expansive vistas that may be seen on the more typical open ski slopes. One might even encounter non-hibernating tree squirrels, rabbits, or even an ermine. Snow-draped trees may remind of a scene Walt Disney might have created, and if along a stream, patches of open water may gurgle at you with dashing white water that then disappears below the white blanket.

A final word: Eventually, after selecting the tactic to apply, you must "Point the skis down the hill; let them buck; the mountain will teach you!"

Contents of "TACTICS FOR TERRAINS and SNOW TEXTURES and RACING":
Overview
Skiing Groomed Snow
Skiing Hard Snow/Ice
Skiing Among Trees
Skiing Narrow trails--you are on this page.
Skiing Moguls
Skiing Powder Snow
Skiing Cold Snow-Warm Snow/New Snow-Old Snow
Skiing "Spring" Snow
Skiing Steeps

Skiing Gates/Racing

"SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT"--a skiing web manual:    Skiing Web Manual Contents   Why Read This Skiing Web Manual That First Skiing Lesson  A Little Skiing History  A Little Skiing History   Motion inSkiing  Conventional Skiing Wisdoms  Skier Excuses   Fear in Skiing  Conditioning for Skiing  How Skis Work   Equipment and Technique  Skiing Equipment  How to Develop Balance on Skis  A Skiing Turn Simplified  The Final Skiing Skill: pressure management   TACTICS FOR TERRAINS and SNOW TEXTURES and RACING Skiing Tips and Tales--a potpourri    Exercises for Developing Skiing Skills  Children and Skiing Age and Skiing  Gender & Skiing  Culture & Skiing  Skiing Ethics and Slope Survival Slope Safety  Skiing Environment  Videos and Apps  Glossary  Acknowledgements SkiMyBest Website Contents  

This "Skiing Narrow Trails" page last modified November 5, 2019. Did you come here from a link on another website? For latest version of this page, copy to your browser: http://www.SkiMyBest.com/skinartr.htm. Copyright © 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020. William R Jones.